Nextwave 64
Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - Printable Version

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Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - Deleted User - 02-22-2014

This guide is made in the hopes of getting some of you people move hacking, because if an idiot like me can learn how to do it, so can you! This is part one in a series of extremely simplistic hacking tutorials, which I will write as I learn more about hacking. This method is proven idiot proof, as it works for ME. Credit for this goes to WldFb, Super El Guapo, wwefan4life2, and barskio.

Everything you need to know about splicing animations is not going to be told here. Everything you need to know to begin splicing animations will be. This tutorial will cover splicing animations, and toki 2 mods for ending the animation.

It will also make you facepalm yourself for not trying move hacking sooner.

What you will need for this tutorial:

Project 64 2.1 (You must create a free account to download the emulator)

Open Office

The New Hacking Starter Kit

Includes the following::



Of course, you will also need Notepad. Smile

:ohyeah Let's get this party started!
Part 1: Splicing your animation
-----------------------------------------------------------------

-Open WldFb's 4P Move Converter

-Open Project 64 2.1

-Enter the Smackdown Mall

-Proceed to a CAW's movelist section

-Find the move you want to splice

-At the frame you want to splice at, hit "F2" to freeze the emulator.

-View your memory in your debugger. (If your debugger doesn't appear in your emu, check your options\settings\advanced\enable debugger to make sure it is ticked.)

[Image: BhpvAEb.png]

-In your memory viewer, you will need to search for the values of player one (and player two if splicing animations for both wrestlers).  If you are searching for player 1's values, you will type '8006b454', if you are searching for player 2, you will type '8006b514'. Make sure you hit enter so it gives you the proper values.

[Image: HyAuCeg.png]

-After you search for either player one or two, you will need to find the first 8 digits in the top row of the memory editor.

[Image: APkD0wI.png]

The first four digits represent the value of the animation you want to splice. The second set of four digits represent the frame you are splicing it at.

In WldFb's movehack converter, place the values you found in their proper place (repeat for player 2 if using their values):

[Image: 09TSjSj.png]

-Find the move you want to splice into, and hit "F2" to freeze your emulator at the frame you want. Search for player 1 and 2's values the same way you would, except this time you want to take the back eight digits.

[Image: 6lRQa0D.png]

The first four represent the move section of the move you are splicing into, and second four represent the frame. We need to take these values and place them in their proper spots in WldFb's tool (repeat for player two if necessary):

[Image: enjiGJP.png]

Ka-Pow, you've just spliced an animation, and WldFb's tool has written the code for you! In row "I" of his tool you should see the code written for player one, with the following three rows containing the 4 player conversion! You may need to change the frames you splice to make it look cleaner, but this is the basic concept behind most move hacks.

If you want to add additional splices, you repeat the steps I just showed you. Put the initial splice code WldFb tool made into your emulator and activate it, wait until you get to the frame you want to make you second splice, and repeat these steps. Smile

:ohyeah Let's get rid of that glitch at the end!
Part 2: Toki 2
-----------------------------------------------------------
Toki 2's tell the game what the ending animation is, and how many frames of animation it has for the move you spliced, and they are needed in just about every hack.

Open TKS's toki tool provided in the hacking starter kit and place the 4 digit value of your move into the top slot and hit 'calculate'. Take the toki 2 address, whatever it may be, and add '2' to it. This let's you manipulate how many frames of animation you move has.

XXXXXXXX XXXX - So the first 8 digits will be this number, and the last 4 will be the number of frames you move should be. It should be easy to gauge how many frames it will need based on where you make your splices. Just remember you are using hex, so your numerals go from 1-0, and then A-F. Wink

Now to determining the ending animation, we will take the base address of the toki tool from TKS's tool and not add 2, just keep it as it is, and use the following values to determine which ending animation is needed for the hack. These values can also be found in the hacking starter kit under "more tokis":

Edit from wwefan4life2:

Quote: Wrote:{ } - There is a better way to do that. Get animation value of the last animation you spliced in, and get the Toki 2's for that animation, take the address you get and copy it. Open up the Toki_Mods_2_values notepad and search the address you copied down. Take the line that is highlighted and the next three lines under that one (for a total of 4 lines".

Take the values you get from the last animation sliced in, and put them with the Toki 2 addresses of the animation that is being replaced. Now the animation that is being replaced, will have the ending of the animation being spliced in. This makes it so you have the correct ending and you don't have to guess what the proper ending animation should be.
Spoiler:


I will update the second part of this guide with pics and a simpler explanation, but I am in a bit of a hurry at the moment. However, this should be enough to get a lot of you to start hacking. Now get to it!

Other Resources:
Barskio's Notepads


Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - AKI Man - 02-22-2014

Fantastic! I can honestly say move hacking has been one thing that has interested me the least, but the appreciation for the people who do move hacking is pure respect and admiration.


Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - Deleted User - 02-22-2014

If I can do it, you can too, brutha. Smile After you or anyone gets their head wrapped around this guide, I would look at Barskio's for a more in-depth presentation and explanation.


Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - KWG - 02-23-2014

Just came to tell that notepad is a god tool,I'll repost when I get results.
I didn't got the "and the last 4 will be the number of frames you move should be. It should be easy to gauge how many frames it will need based on where you make your splices",I have no idea on how to calculate that.


Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - Deleted User - 02-23-2014

Depending on the move I guess differently. For instance, strike moves usually have less than 0020 frames, and for grapples, 0040 can usually be a good starting point.

If you're splicing at say, frame 002b and the animation has a bit to go, add ten and go from there. The more you do it the better you will get at approximating the frames needed.

Sometimes you will have to do this multiple times before you get the results you want.


Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - barskio - 02-23-2014

Great job, I hope this inspires people to hack.


Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - wwefan4life2 - 02-23-2014

"Now to determining the ending animation, we will take the base address of the toki tool from TKS's tool and not add 2, just keep it as it is, and use the following values to determine which ending animation is needed for the hack. These values can also be found in the hacking starter kit under "more tokis":"

There is a better way to do that. Get animation value of the last animation you spliced in, and get the Toki 2's for that animation, take the address you get and copy it. Open up the Toki_Mods_2_values notepad and search the address you copied down. Take the line that is highlighted and the next three lines under that one (for a total of 4 lines".

Take the values you get from the last animation sliced in, and put them with the Toki 2 addresses of the animation that is being replaced. Now the animation that is being replaced, will have the ending of the animation being spliced in. This makes it so you have the correct ending and you don't have to guess what the proper ending animation should be.


Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - Wolfpac_69 - 02-23-2014

You rule CBV, your the best all round modder today hands down, the support you offer this community is inspiring in itself




Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - KWG - 02-23-2014

CBV Wrote:{ Feb 23 2014, 12:52:46 AM } - Depending on the move I guess differently. For instance, strike moves usually have less than 0020 frames, and for grapples, 0040 can usually be a good starting point.

If you're splicing at say, frame 002b and the animation has a bit to go, add ten and go from there. The more you do it the better you will get at approximating the frames needed.

Sometimes you will have to do this multiple times before you get the results you want.
So I should get the frame I am splicing and do XXXX - 0040 (grapple)?


Move Hacking for Dummies Part 1: Animation Splicing - wwefan4life2 - 02-23-2014

Just pick a number and either subtract or add frames until the glitching is gone.

00FF is the highest number of frames you can set, any more than that and during the match if you do the move, the move will cut off before it starts basically.